Category Archives: THOUGHTS ON

Spider-Man PS4 – Hopes and Concerns

Spidey PS4 face

Hey all, Matt here! Just a minute ago, I finished watching the PlayStation E3 2017 live press conference. I’ve got a couple of thoughts on the show I’d like to share in a future post, where I’ll be writing about my thoughts on E3 2017 in its entirety. However, right now I’d like to focus on PlayStation’s final game that was shown at their E3 showcase, Spider-Man on PS4.

 

Ever since a new Spidey game was teased during last year’s E3, I’ve been patiently waiting for new information on the web-slinger’s PS4 debut. I have not felt excited about a new Spider-Man game since I played Spider-Man 2 on the Gamecube back in the mid-2000’s. That isn’t to say all of the Spider-Man games since then have been bad, but the ones that I played have certainly fallen short of expectation.

 

Since the announcement that Insomniac Games would be heading development on a new Spider-Man game, I’ve felt a stronger hope for a strong new entry in Spidey’s long list of video game releases. As the creators of Ratchet & Clank, Sunset Overdrive, and Resistance, I had faith that Insomniac Games would deliver an amazing new title in Spider-Man.

 

Today’s short demonstration at the end of PlayStation’s E3 event for Spider-Man has left me excited to see more of the game, and also worried about a few of the chosen mechanical decisions.

Spidey goop

Let’s cut to the chase – What am I most worried about? Well, I think anyone who saw the latest gameplay was quick to notice the frequent reliance on QTE’s throughout the demo, otherwise known as quick time events. This event is when a game wrestles control from the player and asks them to press a certain button, usually displayed on-screen, in time with the game’s action. Most of the time I don’t mind QTE’s as long as they aren’t entirely relied upon, but I wasn’t expecting quite the large number of them to show up in the gameplay demo as they did. Although Spidey’s basic combat looked solid, and the stealth sections interesting, the QTE’s that appeared in between encounters made me a bit disappointed. I think an over-reliance of QTE’s causes a lower level of excitement to continue playing a game, because it feels like the player is allowing the game to play itself, as opposed to the player being in total control of the experience.

 

Regardless, it was an exciting demo to show off, teasing at the involvement of Wilson Fisk (A.K.A. Kingpin) being involved with Spider-Man in one way or another, and I’m curious to see where the team at Insomniac Games takes the story.

 

Now that my initial worries are out of the way, what am I excited about in Spider-Man for PS4? Well, my answer probably won’t surprise anyone.

 

The swinging looks good. Straight up, it looks smooth, precise, and appears to offer a good level of control over Spidey’s mid-air movements. Obviously I have not played the game for myself, so I cannot attest to if the swinging really is any of these things, but that is how I felt from watching the gameplay stream.

Spidey PS4 logo.png

More than anything else from this E3, I was looking forward to Spider-Man on PS4. While the game is still at the top of my radar, I felt a little underwhelmed by the game’s first live demonstration. The entire sequence felt a little too linear and quick-time focused for my taste, with only a glimpse at the open-world swinging to be offered. However, I am still eagerly awaiting more news about the game, and will be there on day one to play Spider-Man on PS4. I still have hope that Insomniac will give Spider-Man fans a game that they enjoy, and frankly, deserve.

 

If you’ve made it this far, thank you for reading. Feel free to follow me for any future posts I create.

 

  • Matt

Generational Shock: Growing Up With Gaming

 

phone gaming icons

Hey folks, I wanted to share a story about something that happened to me yesterday. I thought it was interesting and relevant enough to write here.

 

To set up the narrative – I currently work as a part-time employee at a local pet store, and each day when my shift ends I pick up a family friend’s kids from school and drop them off at their home. They don’t have a ride back home, and the friend of mine needed her kids driven back to their house from school, so I’ve been helping them with this for the past few months.

 

Anyway, the two kids and I were driving back home, and the topic of conversation turned to Injustice 2, the newly released fighting game by NetherRealm Studios for the PS4 and Xbox One. The older of the siblings asked me if I had played the new Injustice game, and I replied that no, I had not. However, I have seen a decent amount of gameplay, and think that the game looks fun. The kid went on to talk about which characters were his favorite to play as, and we spoke about the interesting roster that the game features. I then asked him which platform he plays the game on, out of curiosity, and he replied “What do you mean? I’m playing it on my iPhone.”

available on app store

To be honest, this reply caught me a bit off guard. For starters, I had completely forgotten that a touch-friendly, free-to-play port of Injustice 2 was brought to mobile. I was fully expecting the kid to say that he played the game on a traditional gaming console, but this was not the case. The kid’s younger sibling then mentioned that they were thinking about playing the game as well, since it was a free download from the App Store. This statement is what got me thinking: How are the kids of today experiencing video games that is similar or different to how I played games while growing up?

app store google play

For reference, my previous blog post was about the very first video game that I played, which was Pokemon Pinball for the Gameboy Color. It was also the only game system that I owned, until the Gamecube showed up in my living room as a birthday present in 2004. Growing up, my parents did not buy me many video games, and because of this I made the most out of the games that I did manage to receive. I caught nearly every Pokemon in Pokemon Silver, discovered every secret collectible in Wario Land 3, and beat Super Mario Land more times than I can count. In addition to this, my parents restricted my playtime to half an hour a day. I think this is a smart move for many kids, because any responsible parent wants to teach their child self-control and patience. That being said, I admit I would occasionally sneak the Gameboy into my room late at night to have a bit of extra game time. Still, I believe the limited game time was a smart choice, as it taught me a level of self-control.

App store icon

I wonder how this restriction is applied in today’s world of video games being available on most devices that we own. When I was a child, mobile phones did not occupy the same level of popularity as they do today, and playing video games on a mobile phone was a distant dream. Of course, there were some phones that offered simple games like Snake or Solitaire, but these are a far cry from the Injustices, Infinity Blades, or the Plants Vs. Zombies games offered in the mobile market today. Do the parents of kids that play these games collect their child’s phones past a certain hour to restrict their access to playing these games? This is something that my parents usually enforced when I was a child, but I wonder if similar behavior is used by today’s parents.

 

This also brings me to another thought I had. When there are a bevy of free games available on the mobile market, does a child raised on free-to-play games ever want to spend actual money for more in-depth experiences, such as those found on a traditional game console? These are questions that cannot be answered at this moment in time, because the mobile gaming market is, technically, still in its infancy. The effect that it has on kids growing up playing these free-to-start applications cannot yet be analyzed in an efficient manner, but I hope there are other people like myself curious about how it affects kids that play games in the future. Maybe the kids that play a bunch of free-to-play mobile games will feel fully satisfied with their touch-controlled experiences, or perhaps they will still desire an experience found only on PC or on a console. In addition to this, will the mobile market affect kids’ desire to one hundred percent complete a game, like I did in my youth? The vast amount of choices given to App Store users is staggering, featuring a near lifetime of games to play. Will kids feel satisfied with these choices? Granted, a good chunk of these App Store games are considered by some to be garbage-tier, but the point remains. To be clear, I do not believe that mobile games will take over the AAA market space any time soon. No, far from it. I just wanted to share this thought I had. 

mobile gaming options

I suppose this post doesn’t answer any of the questions that I brought up, but instead has caused me to think on the effect that the mobile market will have on kids growing up. I thought it’d be an interesting thought to share here, and if you’ve made it this far, I hope you enjoyed the read. Feel free to let me know your thoughts in the comments. Thank you!

 

  • Matt

THOUGHTS ON: ARMS ‘Test Punch’

 

Arms global testpunchI just finished playing my second suite of matches in ARMS, Nintendo’s brand new fighting game that is slated to release for the Switch next month on June 16th. I wrote a previous blog post here stating why I was excited to play ARMS, and after battling a myriad of foes during the game’s ‘Test Punch’ as Nintendo has called it (essentially a free, online-only demo of the game’s mechanics) I can confirm that my excitement was well justified, and I’ll tell you why.

 

The ‘Test Punch’ that Nintendo has released for ARMS began yesterday in multiple time zones across the globe, and I patiently waited to play the game at 8PM EST last night. Hey, I didn’t have any plans on Friday night, I figured why not give the latest Nintendo game a shot? I have a Switch, after all. Don’t make fun of me!

 

Anyway, to say that I performed poorly during my first few matches of ARMS would be selling it short. In a word, I was dreadful when I began playing. I started my playtime using the two separated joy-con controllers to try out the game’s oft-advertised motion control scheme that critics have been praising, and initially found it to be disappointing. The motion controls felt somewhat precise, sure, but my lack of full understanding in the game’s mechanics meant that I lost way more games than I won. I also felt somewhat tired by the end of my session (to clarify – I later realized I swung my punches way too hard and more forceful than necessary) and this diminished my enjoyment with the game. During this first session, I did not think of giving the Switch Pro controller a go, considering the game’s marketing has so far centered solely on using the motion controls within the joy-con controllers.

arms fight

Earlier today, I corrected that mistake. I started up my second session with ARMS by utilizing the Switch Pro controller, and I found myself landing hits and throwing out grabs at my opponents more easily than before. The controller mapping took some getting used to, despite the game’s surprisingly low amount of required button presses. Seriously, if you’re playing ARMS using a standard Pro controller, the game doesn’t require all of the controller’s buttons to play; certain attacks and combos are mapped to multiple buttons on the controller.

mechanica

The game’s complexity is not at first noticeable. There are a wide variety of weapons (or arms) to choose from, but within the Test Punch, each of the seven fighters only has access to three. This gives you a good idea of the different playstyles that each fighter can utilize, and what their abilities and body types have on offer. For example, the heavier characters Master Mummy and Mechanica can take multiple hits without flinching but are slow, while smaller characters like Ninjara and Ribbon Girl can nimbly dash around the battlefield but take bigger hits of damage from attacks. The level of variety with just the seven fighters on offer made each match I played feel different each time, and forced me to think of a strategy to effectively take out the opponent. I found myself gravitating toward Mechanica, with her large health bar and jump-jets appealing to me. 

 

The Test Punch offers a few different game modes. 1v1, 2v2, 1v1v1, and volleyball are the game modes present. They are all pretty self-explanatory, but as expected, I found the 1v1 battles the most enjoyable. The 1v1v1 battles are a pain in the butt, because the game does not tell you how to cycle between opponents during targeting. When playing with the upright separated joy-con controllers, opponents can be cycled through by clicking the ABXY buttons on the right joy-con, or the directional buttons on the left joy-con. This made the three-player as well as four-player battles much easier to manage amidst the flurry of punches being thrown across the battlefield.

Min min

Despite this oversight of not explaining how to cycle through targets, the game does a decent job of explaining its mechanics to new players. It took me two different play sessions, but I eventually found myself zipping through the air and across the ground, capable of performing the correct punches and grabs that I wished to do.

 

ARMS is a very unique fighting game with a great premise. If this first Test Punch is a sign of the game’s online multiplayer quality, I am satisfied with the result. I experienced zero perceivable lag throughout my playtime, and suffered no disconnects. There were a few opponents of mine that dropped from the match, and it cannot be said if they were forcefully disconnected or left of their own will, but my own online experience worked flawlessly. I hope (and expect) in the final release of the game that we will be able to tailor our online gameplay experience in the ways that we enjoy most, instead of being forced to play all of the Test Punches available modes, despite how fun they can sometimes be. This first free experience of ARMS leaves me wanting more, and I think I’ll be there for day one of the game’s release.

arms logo

Did you have the chance to play the Test Punch? Have any thoughts after playing ARMS, or are you waiting until the game’s full release to play? Or, do you have little interest in the game? Feel free to let me know in the comments, and thank you for reading. Have a great Memorial Day weekend!

 

  • Matt

Why Do I Keep Returning to Titanfall 2?

Titanfall 2 released on October 28th, 2016 for the PS4, Xbox One, and Origin on PC.

On the day that I am writing this, it is the 15th of May 2017, and I still find myself picking up the game every few days in between playing Persona 5 and Nier Automata.

Why is this? What does Titanfall 2 do so well that keeps me coming back for more online multiplayer action? I’d like to answer this question with a few reasons as to why I find Respawn Entertainment’s latest game so enticing.

titanfall-2

Firstly, and perhaps most importantly, the game is extremely satisfying to play. Running at a buttery smooth 60 frames-per-second on all platforms compliments the fast reflexes required for the constant jumping and shooting you’ll be doing as a Pilot. Pulling off just the right angle for a well-timed grappling hook shot can mean the difference between life or death as you propel yourself through the sky, shooting down baddies and dodging their returning fire. Or better yet, use your grappling hook to pull an enemy pilot to your position and kick them in the noggin, sending the enemy flying. The combination of fast aerial movement, double-jumping, and utilizing your grappling hook makes for many memorable moments as you fling yourself through the sky. The grappling hook isn’t the only effective Pilot ability in your arsenal, but it has grown to become my favorite of the bunch. The high-speed thrills of running fast with a stim ability usage is another favorite pilot skill of mine, as it allows for incredibly-large jumps through the air to gain the advantage on your enemy. There have been so many moments – no, too many moments to count – that have had my jaw hang open with the awesome action that was happening both around me, and because of my actions. Your actions on the battlefield as a Pilot offer an adrenaline rush like no other online shooter. 

lego-titanfall

Secondly, future map packs for Titanfall 2 are completely free of charge. This is a somewhat recent trend among games with large online communities, and it is one that I welcome with open arms. It ensures the player base is unfragmented by paid DLC barring entry for players unwilling to pay extra money for maps, thus improving the longevity of a game’s online community. It’s unfortunate that another EA game from last year did not follow this trend (Battlefield 1) but I am very happy to see that Titanfall 2 has taken a more consumer-friendly approach.

 

Thirdly, it is extremely fast and easy to hop into an online match and begin playing. Depending on the game mode, online matches can be completed anywhere from 8-12 minutes, offering many opportunities to feel like a badass as a Pilot. This is in stark contrast to the other EA title that I mentioned earlier, Battlefield 1. While I have enjoyed the online matches of BF1 that I have played, the initial load time for the game’s first battle can be a bit on the lengthy end. I found myself sitting on the futon for a solid two minutes before the game finally finished loading. Thankfully, this hasn’t been the case every time I have played the game, but it definitely makes me second guess booting the game up (for context, I’m playing on a PS4 Pro. I’m not sure how the load times compare on other platforms).

 

Lastly, I know this is commonly part of the praise that the game receives when it is brought up, but I have enjoyed Titanfall 2’s single-player campaign enough to have finished it three times. It is not a very long campaign, but it encourages replayability via the multiple routes that can be taken in most levels to take down the enemy. I also found the writing and set-pieces to be solid and engaging enough to want to experience them multiple times.

tf2 ye

There’s multiple reasons why Titanfall 2 was my game of the year 2016, but this short piece summarized some of the biggest reasons why I keep returning to play this game into the next year. As long as Respawn continues to provide support for their incredible game, I can see myself playing Titanfall 2 for even more months to come.

Now excuse me, but it’s time for me to hop back into the pilot seat at least once more.

Thanks for reading!

  • Matt

 

Persona 5 – I’ve Played 70 Hours, Here’s My Impressions So Far (No Spoilers)

  • Just for reference: I am currently about 70 hours through the main game, and am halfway through the sixth palace.

Man, I’ve been waiting for this game for quite some time. This year marked the release of a ton of fantastic games, but Persona 5 is a title that has been on my most-anticipated list for years. Remember the initial release window that Atlus announced?

P5 initial release date

My, how time has flied by.

Waiting for this game was not quite so painful for me as it was for other fans, because my only other Persona experience is in Persona 4 Golden released for the PlayStation Vita. It is a fantastic game, and left me wanting to see more from the series. Since the announcement of Persona 5, I have been avoiding any and all online coverage of the game beyond the intro cinematic trailer that debuted what feels like years ago.

After sinking 100+ hours into P4G, I knew what I was getting into when I started up P5. The crazy premise for the protagonist to begin his wacky adventure, the enjoyable and fun cast of characters, the stylish menus – and man, are those menus stylish as hell – are all present in this latest entry. Even though the core formula is the same – level up your protagonist through battles, build your relationship with friends you meet along the way, and fuse collected personas – it does not feel at all repetitive, thanks to the simply astounding menu design that takes place. From the battle selection all the way to managing inventory items, pressing the directional buttons to navigate your way through boxes never before felt so satisfying.

P5 wallpaper

Characters and enemies all have a satisfying pop to them that helps their appearance stand out and give weight to each battle, and every action performed is straightforward and quick. The loading times outside of the initial game load are extremely short, and I have yet to run into any bugs or glitches, as expected. This game is polished to a fine sheen, and it shows very quickly upon starting up.

The plot device for the game’s narrative to progress forward is both captivating and very different from the quiet introduction of Persona 4’s story; as someone who thought that the pace of P4’s beginning was a bit sluggish, seeing P5 start out strong is an exciting change. Having played P4G before this game, working with the persona fusions is easier to understand and still a lot of fun. I can definitely understand where confusion for newcomers may lie, and it is good to see that the game does an even better job of explaining persona fusions this time around.

P5 steelbook cover

I wish I could say that I have been taking my time with this game, but that is not entirely the case. Upon Persona 5’s western release on April 4th, 2017, I dumped a disgusting amount of time playing the game within the first week. Since then, I have taken a step back and done other activities to step my life forward, but I’m still steadily trucking through this (so far) fantastic new entry in the Persona series.

“This is a really amazing time for video games.” I’ve heard that phrase uttered a few times during different podcasts I listen to over the past few weeks, and it could not be any more true. There’s truly something for everybody; and if you like Japanese games, this is a dream come true. I still have to make time to play (and save up money) for Nier: Automata, Resident Evil 7, Gravity Rush 2, Yakuza Zero, and Mario Kart 8: Deluxe. I’ll be posting here in the near future about my thoughts on other games that I’ll be playing, but if you want to let me know your thoughts on what you’ve been playing, I’d love to hear it. Or, if you want to give me your thoughts on my writing, that is also appreciated. I always look for new ways to improve.

Thanks for reading! Have a wonderful week.

  • Matt

THOUGHTS ON: Nintendo Switch – The Lead-Up to Launch

Hey everyone, hope all of you are doing well. I have to admit, after writing my last blog post, I felt relieved to get some of my personal thoughts off my chest. I don’t often share that sort of stuff, and I think writing it down helped me a lot, so thanks to anyone who read it.

Anyway, let’s get moving on to the next topic! This one is all about the Nintendo Switch.

switch

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, the huge blow-out event for the Nintendo Switch recently aired, showing off plenty of new information about the system. We got to hear about the launch line-up, system price, future software, and system features. However, I’m not going to go into the general specifications here, because plenty of other outlets have already reported on it. Instead, I’m just going to provide a few of my thoughts on the system and its potential in Nintendo’s future.

My first feeling after the presentation concluded could be described as disappointment. The launch day software was thinner than I anticipated, and the pricing of accessories to compliment the Switch appear more expensive than any of us had imagined. I still hold these same feelings of disappointment on accessory pricing, but the price of the system itself is pretty much what I expected. I’m still impressed at the sort of technology that Nintendo was able to cram into the device. My thoughts on the system overall have remained positive. If the software that Nintendo promised for 2017 remains on lock to release this year, then we have a strong first year coming to the Switch. Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Mario Odyssey, Splatoon 2, Arms, Xenoblade 2, and more titles in addition to these making their way to the system in the first year would be a huge gain for Nintendo. I’m very happy with the software that has been shown to be coming soon, but it all depends on if Nintendo stays true to their word and releases these games on time.

nintendoswitch_supermarioodyssey_presentation2017_scrn04_bmp_jpgcopy

More than delaying these games until a later date, there is something else that worries me about the Switch. It isn’t the hardware pricing, the lack of free online multiplayer, or a drought of software; it is the potential that Nintendo will decide to create another dedicated handheld device. Until the presentation’s debut, the Switch had been marketed extremely well by Nintendo, and made many of us believe that this new system would replace both the home console and handheld system line for Nintendo’s future. This is a move that I’ve been waiting years for; no longer do people have to shell out money for multiple systems in order to play Nintendo’s newest software. All they would need is a Switch purchase, and boom, they’ve got a nice lineup of Nintendo’s catalog available. However, if Nintendo feels that the Switch is not selling well enough, they may feel tempted to come up with a secondary system, one that focuses exclusively on handheld games, as opposed to the Switch’s capabilities as a home console and a handheld system. In my opinion, this would be the worst decision that the company could make with the Switch. Although I still plan on purchasing a Switch day one, (I have a pre-order locked in) I would still feel annoyed if a new system were to be introduced, after Nintendo’s heavy messaging that this system is the best of both worlds. With all of Nintendo’s efforts focused on the Switch (and for some months to come, the 3DS) the company would be able to direct all of their team’s’ efforts toward developing games on that system, instead of dividing software between a handheld and home console. In theory, this would give the system a steady stream of new software, convincing more people that the Switch is worth purchasing, and reassure them that they don’t need to buy a second system in order to enjoy all of Nintendo’s offerings. It’s too early to tell if Nintendo will double down its efforts on the Switch, foregoing their traditional handheld offerings, but I certainly hope they remain solely focused on the Switch and bring even more compelling games to the system.

zelda-botw-wallpaper-5

The slow trickle of information since the presentation’s conclusion has made the wait for March 3rd all the more difficult, but it won’t be long now. Despite some of the negativity in this post, I am looking extremely forward to launch day. Right now I’ve only got Zelda and Binding of Isaac: Afterbirth + planned for purchase, because, well, the other launch day offerings don’t cater to my interests. Still, if there’s any game that I’ve felt is worth buying a system day-one for, it’s Zelda. Binding of Isaac is also a nice plus, because I never got around to playing the latest two expansions. Having sunk many hours into both original Isaac as well as Rebirth, I’m looking forward to seeing what’s new.

How do you feel about the Switch? Plan on picking one up soon, waiting for the game software to grow, or never plan on buying it? Feel free to let me know! Thanks for reading, guys.

  • Matt

About Me, Nintendo Switch, and What I’ve Been Playing

Hey folks, Matt here. I realize I’ve been absent from here a little while now – that appears to be becoming the norm! Hopefully that won’t be the case this time. However, I wanted to elaborate on why I tend to disappear from time to time. In a bit of a selfish way, it’ll also be a cathartic experience for myself writing about my past and present.

 

I’ve dealt with anxiety and depression for as long as I can remember. I’ve visited multiple therapists, each one providing a growing experience for me as I’ve found it easier to talk about my personal thoughts and feelings. I think a lot of people underestimate how difficult it can be for others to open up about their personal issues – it isn’t always a simple thing to do, because people are complex. There’s a lot of stuff that goes on in our minds; some of it is triggered by external events or difficulties in life, and other times, people just feel upset or stressed out for seemingly no reason (myself included). These are difficult things to deal with, but therapy and prescribed medication has brought me a long way since I first started seeing my most recent therapist.

 

My lowest point was a few years back, with what feels like a lifetime ago. In 2014, I lost nearly every friend that I had made during my time spent away from home at university. I had worked hard to maintain friendships that I thought would last for years to come because of how strong they felt, but it all came crashing down in the early months of 2014. Without going into detail, to put it simply, I felt I had been betrayed by the people I spent many days laughing and confiding personal thoughts with. I began failing my courses, consumed with an overwhelming feeling of dread and sadness in the state I found myself in. Where I once felt I belonged in a community of people who accepted me, I felt isolated from nearly everyone I had come to know.

 

There were a couple of people who stuck with me, despite my low point, and I won’t soon forget what they did to help me. I wish I could again express my appreciation to them for their support during my rough point. If you’re reading this, I hope you know who you are!

 

A quarter of the way through the Spring semester, I decided to drop out of university, because I did not want my grades to suffer. My family was very supportive of this decision, and I have lived at home since then, slowly gaining a stronger feeling of confidence and working hard at giving myself a better mindset. I have accepted that the people I once knew will most likely not show up in my life again, and embraced it. Making new friends is challenging, but I know there are assuredly people out there that are willing to get to know me, as I would for them. It’s all about finding the people you can connect with, and sticking with ‘em.

 

Anyway, to wrap this up, I still deal with anxiety and depression, but I have significantly improved since my days away at school. I’ve held a couple of stressful jobs that have built character, dealt with loss and betrayal, and grown in more ways than I expected. All I hope is that the coming days will provide even more growing experiences with plenty of opportunity around each corner.

So! Moving that personal stuff to the side… I watched the Nintendo Switch presentation last night. It started at 11PM EST for me, as I live in the tri-state area.

switch-dog

Some quick thoughts: Overall, I feel a bit disappointed. The Switch still looks to be a compelling piece of hardware, with some solid hit games on the horizon (Mario Odyssey and Splatoon 2 are some of my biggest anticipated Nintendo titles) but I’m concerned about the lack of compelling launch software. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild almost makes up for other compelling games at the system’s release, and I’m very surprised and pleased by the March 3rd release date, but I was hoping we would see Mario Kart 8: Deluxe show up alongside Zelda, or possibly Arms make its debut sooner than Summer of 2017. Despite this, I still feel somewhat tempted to grab a system Day One, and thankfully I was able to secure a system pre-order at my local Best Buy earlier today. I don’t yet know if I’ll go through with the final purchase, but we’ll see how I feel leading up to launch.

 

The price of new joy-con and the pro controller is disappointing, and the news that Nintendo will begin charging for online multiplayer is something that I was most afraid to hear. I fear that Splatoon 2’s online community will suffer because of the forced paywall to access the online portion, but only time will tell if people are willing to cough up more money to play online.

 

Thankfully, other Nintendo games like Mario and Zelda don’t appear to require online multiplayer capabilities to be enjoyable, so they won’t rely heavily on the online connectivity as much as Splatoon 2 most likely will, from early indication.

 

So, to summarize:

 

Pros:
– Cool future software (Mario, Splatoon 2, Arms)

– Earlier release date than I expected

– Zelda hitting Day One

– $300 price point is about what I expected

 

Cons:

– Eventual online multiplayer paywall

– Lack of compelling software beyond Mario, Splatoon 2, and Arms (where is Pikmin, Metroid, Retro Studios’ new game, or other new IP?)

– High price of additional peripherals ($70 for a pro controller $80 for a new set of joy-con sounds a bit absurd)

 

Overall, it was an okay presentation, not as great as I was hoping. At least we have a city in Super Mario Odyssey named New Donk City. I enjoy the silly names that Nintendo gives their in-game locations and characters.

 

Bye for now! I hope to post again this weekend.

 

Oh, almost forgot to mention. I’ve been playing a lot of Final Fantasy 15. The music is super good. Fun game so far, I’m on chapter 11, and look to finish it very soon. I’d like to write a review upon finishing it.

Oh yeah, and I continue to be engrossed by Titanfall 2’s multiplayer portion. I’m up to my eighth regeneration. Help. All right, bye now, for real!

lego-titanfall

  • Matt