Category Archives: THOUGHTS ON

Shady Business Practices in Video Games

Hi folks, I wanted to write something a little bit different today. Usually I write here about my thoughts on a game I’ve played, be it a new release or an old one, but something caught my eye recently that disgusted me enough to want to write about it.

fortnite title

I haven’t been keeping up with news about the recently-released Fortnite from Epic Games because, well, I don’t really care about the game. The premise simply doesn’t interest me. However, in a recent article from Gamespot, I read that the game has sold over 500,000 copies across three different platforms as of July 26th. That’s a big problem, considering the game will be a free-to-play title in 2018. That’s right, Epic Games is selling an early access title for upwards of $40 that is going to be completely free to start playing by next year.

 

This is a gross business practice that effectively has early buyers acting as bug testers for when the free-to-play release of Fortnite hits digital storefronts. Unlike bug testers, these people are not being paid for what they are doing, but are instead paying the publisher for accessing the unfinished game early. I say unfinished because the FAQ (frequently asked questions) on the official Fortnite web page describes the game as an early access release. I’ll include a link to that page right here.

pac-man cash

It doesn’t matter how finished or complete the game is right now. As it stands, Fortnite is an early access title that will be completely free-to-play starting next year, and players are ponying up cash to access it early. When the free-to-play version releases, the purchase that consumers made to get that early copy will have been for naught, except bragging rights that they played the game ahead of its official release. I’m not one to say how people should be spending their money, but this business practice feels exploitative, especially when you consider people who have a tight budget for new games. Purchasing Fortnite is an effective way to waste money on a release that will soon be available for free.

loot boxes

On top of this, Fortnite offers microtransactions which are available in both the early access release, and will assuredly be available in the free-to-play release as well. As many other people online have correctly stated before, microtransactions have no place in any video game that isn’t free-to-play. It is a shady business practice that breaks the in-game economy by incentivising players to spend extra money to unlock items that may otherwise take many hours to unlock by normal means of playing. Just look at Overwatch, for example. It’s a game that has millions of fans, including myself, but the loot box system in that game is also exploitative and assures that nobody will ever unlock every item unless they pay extra for loot boxes. Even if these items are all cosmetic, they still affect perception of the game and encourage additional purchases on top of the entry level fee for the game itself. Cosmetic items or otherwise, it is gross to have these additional purchases for loot boxes available on top of an up-front fee for the game.

 

Let’s not even get into the whole Middle Earth: Shadow of War news that has been popping up recently about that game’s microtransactions. If you’d like a good breakdown of that game’s price gouging, look no further than this wonderful informative video that was released today by Jim Sterling; I’ll link it right here.

shadow of war microtransactions yeah

The previous game in this Lord of the Rings series, Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor, is a great game that deserved the praise it received back in 2014. The business practices behind its sequel ensure I won’t be playing Shadow of War on day one, if at all in the near future, despite being a fan of both Lord of the Rings and Shadow of Mordor. I refuse to support a single-player, triple-A game release that offers microtransactions on day one. It’s one thing to have these additional payments available in multiplayer-only video games, but it is especially egregious to find them in an exclusively single-player release.

 

If you’ve made it this far, thank you for reading. I’m close to finishing up Rise of the Tomb Raider, a game I’ve wanted to play for a little while now, and I’ll share my thoughts on it soon. Have a great week, all.

 

  • Matt
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Extended Thoughts – GONNER

Gonner banner

Hi everyone! Yesterday, I went back to read my early impressions of Gonner for the Nintendo Switch, and I did not like the piece that I published. It felt rather rushed and didn’t really provide a compelling argument for why I enjoy the game. Here I’ll attempt to give a more thorough understanding as to what Gonner does right and wrong, and why I’m still hooked on this game. If you want an understanding of the basic premise and mechanics within Gonner, feel free to check out my first post about the game from about a week ago.

 

Every time I start playing Gonner, I can’t put the game down for at least a solid thirty minutes, if not longer. Every run through this rogue-lite is exciting, and as you progress further in each run of the game, more combat and maneuverability options become available to the player. Certain collectible skulls offer increased or decreased health, depending on the other perks they offer. Jumping, shooting, wall-hopping, and bouncing on enemies’ heads all feels great to do, featuring a sharp level of control while still giving the player a tiny sense of floatiness to their actions. I do feel like the player should be capable of shooting straight upward, as oftentimes there are enemies that fly straight down making it difficult to dodge them in a way that made these fights feel unfair. However, these scenarios are usually avoidable by being especially careful around flying foes. Eventually the player will learn the battle patterns that each enemy possesses and how best to counter their attacks.

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Not all weapon and ability combinations work well together, and the player will have to do plenty of experimentation to figure out their preferred play style. An interesting (if sometimes frustrating) mechanic in Gonner is when the player is hurt by an enemy attack, they have to manually pick up their skull, weapon, and ability item back up from the ground. Until they pick these items back up, the player can no longer use their items. This leaves the player at a major disadvantage, and they will quickly learn to anticipate where their items may fall if they take a hit.

Gonner shot

A merchant opens up their shop before every boss fight, and gearing up for each battle provides health replenishment and weapon changes at the cost of the in-game currency. That in-game currency is earned in a satisfying manner; not just by killing enemies, but by killing enemies in rapid succession. Every five enemies downed rewards a purple block, and these are used to revive the player and also as shop currency. Remember in my previous post when I said that Gonner teaches very little to the player, besides the basic controls? No? Well, that’s what I briefly mentioned, and it took me several hours of playing to discover that the in-game currency is earned this way. This lack of explanation may perhaps be frustrating to some, but I enjoy discovering game mechanics on my own, so it was fun exploring my options and figuring out how to survive.

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I think the biggest praise I can give to Gonner is that its art style is absolutely gorgeous. The game goes for a minimalistic look, with many walls and floors forming around the player as they progress through each area. Enemies, for the most part, appear far ahead to the player’s vision, so they do not often appear instantly and hurt the player, feeling unfair. Each set of levels, after every 3 levels or so, features a certain color pallette, changing to a very different look upon progressing to the next set of levels. With this in mind, I think the art style serves the game quite well. As the player’s kill combo reaches higher from defeating enemies, the in-game music rapidly picks up speed, encouraging even faster progression for the reward of more purple blocks. For new players, they will probably want to focus more on survival than speed, but once I got a feeling for the first few stages, it felt great to fly through and kill as many enemies in quick succession as possible.

 

Sound and music design is also solid, featuring an abstract tune for each set of levels, fitting the style of play and colors on display. Each shot fired from the player’s ranged weapon gives a satisfying pop, and enemies are blasted away in a smattering of red paste. Combat feels good, and the sound effects from both the weapons and enemies keeps me coming back for more. I do wish that enemies pushed off of ledges into bottomless pits counted toward the score multiplier; as it is now, they simply disappear, offering no extra points for you throwing them off the edge.

Gonner title

If anything that I wrote here sounded intriguing, definitely give this game a look. As of this writing it is available for Nintendo Switch, Windows, and Mac, but I’d be surprised if it didn’t make its way over to PS4 or Xbox One at some point. I’ve only reached the fourth set of levels, but I plan to keep playing and see what the end of the game has to offer.

 

If you’ve made it this far, thank you for reading. Please feel free to provide any criticism, constructive or otherwise, to my writing. I’m always looking to improve. Have a great week!

 

  • Matt

THOUGHTS ON: Gonner

Gonner title

Last week, I noticed some Twitter users that I follow voice their praise toward a recently-released Nintendo Switch game called Gonner. It’s been available on Steam since last October, but was made available for the Switch within the past couple of weeks. The game is a rogue-lite 2D platformer with shooting elements, and the art style was interesting enough for me to give it a look. Static images of the game do not do the art justice, so while I will post some pictures here to spruce up this piece, I recommend watching some gameplay of Gonner before passing judgement on the game. It looks good in motion! Anyway, here are my thoughts of the game after the first few hours.

 

I’m a big fan of randomized levels in video games. Among my favorite games of the past few years are rogue-lites such as Crypt of the Necrodancer and Enter the Gungeon, so when a new game in this genre is shown off, I’ll usually give it a look. Gonner stars a small blob-like creature that collects uniquely-shaped skulls to place on its head. It’s a cute character design that feels at home in the game’s world, despite some dark imagery that pops up during the adventure (one of the merchants between each game is called Death, portrayed as a white cloaked ghost). Every enemy you face against is shaded a crimson red, many of them sporting sharp teeth and a hunger for the player character. The decision to make every enemy the same color keeps the action on screen mostly understandable, so a common coloring scheme is appreciated.

Gonner shot

Similar to other rogue-lite titles, Gonner begins with a short tutorial of its core mechanics. There are no words used to describe these abilities, only a diagram of the player’s controller with buttons on the controller highlighted in accordance to certain actions. During the game’s introduction, the actions that can be performed by the player in the beginning are rather simplistic; jump, shoot, reload, wall-jump, and crouch are all that are provided. Upon completion of the tutorial, however, things get a little more interesting, with different weaponry and abilities to play around with.

 

Different skulls can be collected and equipped by the player to grant them unique abilities, which often aid in hectic combat scenarios. This is also true of the equipment found in the game, which grant the player a tactical edge. Some of these abilities include a time stop for all enemy movement, burst fire from your gun, or an extra jump for those treacherous leaps across chasms. The best part about collecting these items is not the abilities that they provide, but discovering how each of them works. Beyond teaching its basic control scheme, Gonner does not provide the player with an explanation for anything else; that’s up to you to figure out during your adventure. Each of the pick-ups is easily identifiable, and understanding each item’s usage is satisfying. I appreciate when games don’t teach every single mechanic to the player, instead opting to leave things up to experimentation and analysis.

 

The game’s sound design works well with its dimly-lit levels, opting for music that is a lower volume than most other rogue-lite games. The music that plays is punctuated with the strong sounds of firing bullets at your enemies until they explode, providing more ammunition and currency to use in mid-level shops. Enemies communicate their attack patterns well, and figuring these out to most effectively defeat them is crucial to success. Although it may sound odd at first, my favorite part of each level is at the very end. If every enemy in a level is cleared, the music that played throughout that entire level comes to a halt, with the player’s movement and shooting being the only audible in-game sounds. Each time I clear a room entirely of enemies, I feel a small sense of dread when the game’s music cuts out, almost making me feel like a monster. I don’t know if this is the game’s intent, as I have yet to finish it, but I like the style that is on display so far.

Gonner banner

I’m glad I gave Gonner a chance, because the platforming and shooting in this game is very satisfying. Featuring impressive sound mixing and a beautiful art style, I’m looking forward to playing more and seeing what happens during the later levels. If you are into platformers, rogue-lite games, or are just looking for something different on your Switch, definitely give this one a look.

 

If you’ve made it this far, thank you for reading. Please feel free to provide constructive criticism of my writing in the comments below, as I’m always looking to improve. Have a great week, all!

 

  • Matt

Spider-Man PS4 – Hopes and Concerns

Spidey PS4 face

Hey all, Matt here! Just a minute ago, I finished watching the PlayStation E3 2017 live press conference. I’ve got a couple of thoughts on the show I’d like to share in a future post, where I’ll be writing about my thoughts on E3 2017 in its entirety. However, right now I’d like to focus on PlayStation’s final game that was shown at their E3 showcase, Spider-Man on PS4.

 

Ever since a new Spidey game was teased during last year’s E3, I’ve been patiently waiting for new information on the web-slinger’s PS4 debut. I have not felt excited about a new Spider-Man game since I played Spider-Man 2 on the Gamecube back in the mid-2000’s. That isn’t to say all of the Spider-Man games since then have been bad, but the ones that I played have certainly fallen short of expectation.

 

Since the announcement that Insomniac Games would be heading development on a new Spider-Man game, I’ve felt a stronger hope for a strong new entry in Spidey’s long list of video game releases. As the creators of Ratchet & Clank, Sunset Overdrive, and Resistance, I had faith that Insomniac Games would deliver an amazing new title in Spider-Man.

 

Today’s short demonstration at the end of PlayStation’s E3 event for Spider-Man has left me excited to see more of the game, and also worried about a few of the chosen mechanical decisions.

Spidey goop

Let’s cut to the chase – What am I most worried about? Well, I think anyone who saw the latest gameplay was quick to notice the frequent reliance on QTE’s throughout the demo, otherwise known as quick time events. This event is when a game wrestles control from the player and asks them to press a certain button, usually displayed on-screen, in time with the game’s action. Most of the time I don’t mind QTE’s as long as they aren’t entirely relied upon, but I wasn’t expecting quite the large number of them to show up in the gameplay demo as they did. Although Spidey’s basic combat looked solid, and the stealth sections interesting, the QTE’s that appeared in between encounters made me a bit disappointed. I think an over-reliance of QTE’s causes a lower level of excitement to continue playing a game, because it feels like the player is allowing the game to play itself, as opposed to the player being in total control of the experience.

 

Regardless, it was an exciting demo to show off, teasing at the involvement of Wilson Fisk (A.K.A. Kingpin) being involved with Spider-Man in one way or another, and I’m curious to see where the team at Insomniac Games takes the story.

 

Now that my initial worries are out of the way, what am I excited about in Spider-Man for PS4? Well, my answer probably won’t surprise anyone.

 

The swinging looks good. Straight up, it looks smooth, precise, and appears to offer a good level of control over Spidey’s mid-air movements. Obviously I have not played the game for myself, so I cannot attest to if the swinging really is any of these things, but that is how I felt from watching the gameplay stream.

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More than anything else from this E3, I was looking forward to Spider-Man on PS4. While the game is still at the top of my radar, I felt a little underwhelmed by the game’s first live demonstration. The entire sequence felt a little too linear and quick-time focused for my taste, with only a glimpse at the open-world swinging to be offered. However, I am still eagerly awaiting more news about the game, and will be there on day one to play Spider-Man on PS4. I still have hope that Insomniac will give Spider-Man fans a game that they enjoy, and frankly, deserve.

 

If you’ve made it this far, thank you for reading. Feel free to follow me for any future posts I create.

 

  • Matt

Generational Shock: Growing Up With Gaming

 

phone gaming icons

Hey folks, I wanted to share a story about something that happened to me yesterday. I thought it was interesting and relevant enough to write here.

 

To set up the narrative – I currently work as a part-time employee at a local pet store, and each day when my shift ends I pick up a family friend’s kids from school and drop them off at their home. They don’t have a ride back home, and the friend of mine needed her kids driven back to their house from school, so I’ve been helping them with this for the past few months.

 

Anyway, the two kids and I were driving back home, and the topic of conversation turned to Injustice 2, the newly released fighting game by NetherRealm Studios for the PS4 and Xbox One. The older of the siblings asked me if I had played the new Injustice game, and I replied that no, I had not. However, I have seen a decent amount of gameplay, and think that the game looks fun. The kid went on to talk about which characters were his favorite to play as, and we spoke about the interesting roster that the game features. I then asked him which platform he plays the game on, out of curiosity, and he replied “What do you mean? I’m playing it on my iPhone.”

available on app store

To be honest, this reply caught me a bit off guard. For starters, I had completely forgotten that a touch-friendly, free-to-play port of Injustice 2 was brought to mobile. I was fully expecting the kid to say that he played the game on a traditional gaming console, but this was not the case. The kid’s younger sibling then mentioned that they were thinking about playing the game as well, since it was a free download from the App Store. This statement is what got me thinking: How are the kids of today experiencing video games that is similar or different to how I played games while growing up?

app store google play

For reference, my previous blog post was about the very first video game that I played, which was Pokemon Pinball for the Gameboy Color. It was also the only game system that I owned, until the Gamecube showed up in my living room as a birthday present in 2004. Growing up, my parents did not buy me many video games, and because of this I made the most out of the games that I did manage to receive. I caught nearly every Pokemon in Pokemon Silver, discovered every secret collectible in Wario Land 3, and beat Super Mario Land more times than I can count. In addition to this, my parents restricted my playtime to half an hour a day. I think this is a smart move for many kids, because any responsible parent wants to teach their child self-control and patience. That being said, I admit I would occasionally sneak the Gameboy into my room late at night to have a bit of extra game time. Still, I believe the limited game time was a smart choice, as it taught me a level of self-control.

App store icon

I wonder how this restriction is applied in today’s world of video games being available on most devices that we own. When I was a child, mobile phones did not occupy the same level of popularity as they do today, and playing video games on a mobile phone was a distant dream. Of course, there were some phones that offered simple games like Snake or Solitaire, but these are a far cry from the Injustices, Infinity Blades, or the Plants Vs. Zombies games offered in the mobile market today. Do the parents of kids that play these games collect their child’s phones past a certain hour to restrict their access to playing these games? This is something that my parents usually enforced when I was a child, but I wonder if similar behavior is used by today’s parents.

 

This also brings me to another thought I had. When there are a bevy of free games available on the mobile market, does a child raised on free-to-play games ever want to spend actual money for more in-depth experiences, such as those found on a traditional game console? These are questions that cannot be answered at this moment in time, because the mobile gaming market is, technically, still in its infancy. The effect that it has on kids growing up playing these free-to-start applications cannot yet be analyzed in an efficient manner, but I hope there are other people like myself curious about how it affects kids that play games in the future. Maybe the kids that play a bunch of free-to-play mobile games will feel fully satisfied with their touch-controlled experiences, or perhaps they will still desire an experience found only on PC or on a console. In addition to this, will the mobile market affect kids’ desire to one hundred percent complete a game, like I did in my youth? The vast amount of choices given to App Store users is staggering, featuring a near lifetime of games to play. Will kids feel satisfied with these choices? Granted, a good chunk of these App Store games are considered by some to be garbage-tier, but the point remains. To be clear, I do not believe that mobile games will take over the AAA market space any time soon. No, far from it. I just wanted to share this thought I had. 

mobile gaming options

I suppose this post doesn’t answer any of the questions that I brought up, but instead has caused me to think on the effect that the mobile market will have on kids growing up. I thought it’d be an interesting thought to share here, and if you’ve made it this far, I hope you enjoyed the read. Feel free to let me know your thoughts in the comments. Thank you!

 

  • Matt

THOUGHTS ON: ARMS ‘Test Punch’

 

Arms global testpunchI just finished playing my second suite of matches in ARMS, Nintendo’s brand new fighting game that is slated to release for the Switch next month on June 16th. I wrote a previous blog post here stating why I was excited to play ARMS, and after battling a myriad of foes during the game’s ‘Test Punch’ as Nintendo has called it (essentially a free, online-only demo of the game’s mechanics) I can confirm that my excitement was well justified, and I’ll tell you why.

 

The ‘Test Punch’ that Nintendo has released for ARMS began yesterday in multiple time zones across the globe, and I patiently waited to play the game at 8PM EST last night. Hey, I didn’t have any plans on Friday night, I figured why not give the latest Nintendo game a shot? I have a Switch, after all. Don’t make fun of me!

 

Anyway, to say that I performed poorly during my first few matches of ARMS would be selling it short. In a word, I was dreadful when I began playing. I started my playtime using the two separated joy-con controllers to try out the game’s oft-advertised motion control scheme that critics have been praising, and initially found it to be disappointing. The motion controls felt somewhat precise, sure, but my lack of full understanding in the game’s mechanics meant that I lost way more games than I won. I also felt somewhat tired by the end of my session (to clarify – I later realized I swung my punches way too hard and more forceful than necessary) and this diminished my enjoyment with the game. During this first session, I did not think of giving the Switch Pro controller a go, considering the game’s marketing has so far centered solely on using the motion controls within the joy-con controllers.

arms fight

Earlier today, I corrected that mistake. I started up my second session with ARMS by utilizing the Switch Pro controller, and I found myself landing hits and throwing out grabs at my opponents more easily than before. The controller mapping took some getting used to, despite the game’s surprisingly low amount of required button presses. Seriously, if you’re playing ARMS using a standard Pro controller, the game doesn’t require all of the controller’s buttons to play; certain attacks and combos are mapped to multiple buttons on the controller.

mechanica

The game’s complexity is not at first noticeable. There are a wide variety of weapons (or arms) to choose from, but within the Test Punch, each of the seven fighters only has access to three. This gives you a good idea of the different playstyles that each fighter can utilize, and what their abilities and body types have on offer. For example, the heavier characters Master Mummy and Mechanica can take multiple hits without flinching but are slow, while smaller characters like Ninjara and Ribbon Girl can nimbly dash around the battlefield but take bigger hits of damage from attacks. The level of variety with just the seven fighters on offer made each match I played feel different each time, and forced me to think of a strategy to effectively take out the opponent. I found myself gravitating toward Mechanica, with her large health bar and jump-jets appealing to me. 

 

The Test Punch offers a few different game modes. 1v1, 2v2, 1v1v1, and volleyball are the game modes present. They are all pretty self-explanatory, but as expected, I found the 1v1 battles the most enjoyable. The 1v1v1 battles are a pain in the butt, because the game does not tell you how to cycle between opponents during targeting. When playing with the upright separated joy-con controllers, opponents can be cycled through by clicking the ABXY buttons on the right joy-con, or the directional buttons on the left joy-con. This made the three-player as well as four-player battles much easier to manage amidst the flurry of punches being thrown across the battlefield.

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Despite this oversight of not explaining how to cycle through targets, the game does a decent job of explaining its mechanics to new players. It took me two different play sessions, but I eventually found myself zipping through the air and across the ground, capable of performing the correct punches and grabs that I wished to do.

 

ARMS is a very unique fighting game with a great premise. If this first Test Punch is a sign of the game’s online multiplayer quality, I am satisfied with the result. I experienced zero perceivable lag throughout my playtime, and suffered no disconnects. There were a few opponents of mine that dropped from the match, and it cannot be said if they were forcefully disconnected or left of their own will, but my own online experience worked flawlessly. I hope (and expect) in the final release of the game that we will be able to tailor our online gameplay experience in the ways that we enjoy most, instead of being forced to play all of the Test Punches available modes, despite how fun they can sometimes be. This first free experience of ARMS leaves me wanting more, and I think I’ll be there for day one of the game’s release.

arms logo

Did you have the chance to play the Test Punch? Have any thoughts after playing ARMS, or are you waiting until the game’s full release to play? Or, do you have little interest in the game? Feel free to let me know in the comments, and thank you for reading. Have a great Memorial Day weekend!

 

  • Matt

Why Do I Keep Returning to Titanfall 2?

Titanfall 2 released on October 28th, 2016 for the PS4, Xbox One, and Origin on PC.

On the day that I am writing this, it is the 15th of May 2017, and I still find myself picking up the game every few days in between playing Persona 5 and Nier Automata.

Why is this? What does Titanfall 2 do so well that keeps me coming back for more online multiplayer action? I’d like to answer this question with a few reasons as to why I find Respawn Entertainment’s latest game so enticing.

titanfall-2

Firstly, and perhaps most importantly, the game is extremely satisfying to play. Running at a buttery smooth 60 frames-per-second on all platforms compliments the fast reflexes required for the constant jumping and shooting you’ll be doing as a Pilot. Pulling off just the right angle for a well-timed grappling hook shot can mean the difference between life or death as you propel yourself through the sky, shooting down baddies and dodging their returning fire. Or better yet, use your grappling hook to pull an enemy pilot to your position and kick them in the noggin, sending the enemy flying. The combination of fast aerial movement, double-jumping, and utilizing your grappling hook makes for many memorable moments as you fling yourself through the sky. The grappling hook isn’t the only effective Pilot ability in your arsenal, but it has grown to become my favorite of the bunch. The high-speed thrills of running fast with a stim ability usage is another favorite pilot skill of mine, as it allows for incredibly-large jumps through the air to gain the advantage on your enemy. There have been so many moments – no, too many moments to count – that have had my jaw hang open with the awesome action that was happening both around me, and because of my actions. Your actions on the battlefield as a Pilot offer an adrenaline rush like no other online shooter. 

lego-titanfall

Secondly, future map packs for Titanfall 2 are completely free of charge. This is a somewhat recent trend among games with large online communities, and it is one that I welcome with open arms. It ensures the player base is unfragmented by paid DLC barring entry for players unwilling to pay extra money for maps, thus improving the longevity of a game’s online community. It’s unfortunate that another EA game from last year did not follow this trend (Battlefield 1) but I am very happy to see that Titanfall 2 has taken a more consumer-friendly approach.

 

Thirdly, it is extremely fast and easy to hop into an online match and begin playing. Depending on the game mode, online matches can be completed anywhere from 8-12 minutes, offering many opportunities to feel like a badass as a Pilot. This is in stark contrast to the other EA title that I mentioned earlier, Battlefield 1. While I have enjoyed the online matches of BF1 that I have played, the initial load time for the game’s first battle can be a bit on the lengthy end. I found myself sitting on the futon for a solid two minutes before the game finally finished loading. Thankfully, this hasn’t been the case every time I have played the game, but it definitely makes me second guess booting the game up (for context, I’m playing on a PS4 Pro. I’m not sure how the load times compare on other platforms).

 

Lastly, I know this is commonly part of the praise that the game receives when it is brought up, but I have enjoyed Titanfall 2’s single-player campaign enough to have finished it three times. It is not a very long campaign, but it encourages replayability via the multiple routes that can be taken in most levels to take down the enemy. I also found the writing and set-pieces to be solid and engaging enough to want to experience them multiple times.

tf2 ye

There’s multiple reasons why Titanfall 2 was my game of the year 2016, but this short piece summarized some of the biggest reasons why I keep returning to play this game into the next year. As long as Respawn continues to provide support for their incredible game, I can see myself playing Titanfall 2 for even more months to come.

Now excuse me, but it’s time for me to hop back into the pilot seat at least once more.

Thanks for reading!

  • Matt